Saba’s pupils excited to be back in school

Classes at Sacred Heart Primary School in St. John’s kicked off Monday, with an assembly highlighted by a motivational speech to “Use your key to open your mind,” by Pastor Vernon Liburd, writes The Daily Herald.

Sacred Heart School pupils getting off the bus at the start of the new school year.
Sacred Heart School pupils getting off the bus at the start of the new school year.

Principal Diane Wilson of Saba’s only primary school proudly shared with The Daily Herald that the children will also be enjoying some exciting new workshops this year; a three-day first- aid and fire-safety workshop, as well as a classroom management workshop. The last workshop not only teaches the children how to behave in the classroom, but also encourages healthy play and direct contact, with an emphasis on functioning smoothly in the classroom.

Sacred Heart School has also implemented a comprehensive new tracking programme called “Percentis,” to track marks, attendance and goals, as well as other essential benchmarks to help ensure the best pos sible education for each of the children.

The school year runs from the mid-August to the end of June. There are 159 pupils currently enrolled in kindergarten to grade six. The school will also be welcoming four new teachers this year.

Sacred Heart School Principal Diane Wilson (left), new teachers Femke Neunzig (centre) and Selma Neel (right) with a group of pupils ready to get their day started.
Sacred Heart School Principal Diane Wilson (left), new teachers Femke Neunzig (centre) and Selma Neel (right) with a group of pupils ready to get their day started.

Femke Neunzig will be teaching Dutch as a second language, and Selma Neel is teaching Kindergarten I. There will be two more teachers joining shortly.

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One comment

  1. Educational inputs made by Saba and other islands’ school management staff and boards have certainly resulted in achieving great student success and the ability to add value towards creating a progressive society. By the introduction of effective learning techniques and educational programs taught at schools, from early kindergarden to secondary school level,students learn ways of becoming more knowledgeable,functional and productive when placed in the work environment.
    What is frightening however, points to the measure of contribution repatriated by these students towards the sustainable development of the small islands. One question asked by commentators as to whether there exist a ” Brain Drain ” on these islands, if any and what’s the resulting effect on society,when students who upon leaving the island to pursue further studies abroad do not return.
    It would be interesting to listen to conversations for reasons thereof, being articulated by the various educational boards, citizens and management to stem this hiatus. This I believe would introduce reasons for concerns, since the purpose for which large monetary allocations, made possible to education,by various institutions comes in focus.

    Adopted son

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